Discussion:
Fun fact!
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HRM Resident
2017-09-22 13:58:56 UTC
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Today has 12 hours, 10 minutes, and 17 seconds of daylight,
184 seconds less than yesterday -- 3 minutes and 4 seconds.
--
HRM Resident
l***@fl.it
2017-09-22 15:04:08 UTC
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On Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:58:56 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Today has 12 hours, 10 minutes, and 17 seconds of daylight,
184 seconds less than yesterday -- 3 minutes and 4 seconds.
That must be why the day seems to be going so fast :)
HRM Resident
2017-09-22 16:44:00 UTC
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Post by l***@fl.it
On Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:58:56 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Today has 12 hours, 10 minutes, and 17 seconds of daylight,
184 seconds less than yesterday -- 3 minutes and 4 seconds.
That must be why the day seems to be going so fast :)
Actually, time seems to go fast as we get older for a
scientific/psychological reason. Put aside the fact we can't recall
much before age 4-5. It's a constant in my example, anyhow.

Case 1 - A 10-year old child. They have had 10 years of conscious
life(Ignore that they can't remember the first few years, I'm making a
point!), a lot of which is contained in memories. The next year, from
age 10 to 11, represents 10% of their memory. That makes a whole year
seem to last forever . . . remember how long being in school was in
grade 4-5?

Case 2 - A 50-year old adult. They have 50 years of conscious life,
again a lot of which is contained in memories. The next year, from age
50 to 51, represents just 2% of their memory. That makes a whole year
seem relatively short, causing the feeling that time is going by faster.

Case 3 - A 100-year old adult. They have 100 years of conscious life,
and if they don't have dementia, that's a LOT of memories. The next
year, from age 100 to 101, represents just 1% of their memory. That
makes a whole year seem to fly by! Even faster than when you were 50.

That's the scientific reason why time *really* does seem to go
faster as we get older.

As for my original post, yes, the days really do get shorter quite
quickly this time of year . . . right now we are losing about 3 minutes
of daylight until we hit the shortest day of the year. Then the days
start to get longer . . . :-)
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HRM Resident
l***@fl.it
2017-09-22 19:22:54 UTC
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On Fri, 22 Sep 2017 13:44:00 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Post by l***@fl.it
On Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:58:56 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Today has 12 hours, 10 minutes, and 17 seconds of daylight,
184 seconds less than yesterday -- 3 minutes and 4 seconds.
That must be why the day seems to be going so fast :)
Actually, time seems to go fast as we get older for a
scientific/psychological reason. Put aside the fact we can't recall
much before age 4-5. It's a constant in my example, anyhow.
Case 1 - A 10-year old child. They have had 10 years of conscious
life(Ignore that they can't remember the first few years, I'm making a
point!), a lot of which is contained in memories. The next year, from
age 10 to 11, represents 10% of their memory. That makes a whole year
seem to last forever . . . remember how long being in school was in
grade 4-5?
Case 2 - A 50-year old adult. They have 50 years of conscious life,
again a lot of which is contained in memories. The next year, from age
50 to 51, represents just 2% of their memory. That makes a whole year
seem relatively short, causing the feeling that time is going by faster.
Case 3 - A 100-year old adult. They have 100 years of conscious life,
and if they don't have dementia, that's a LOT of memories. The next
year, from age 100 to 101, represents just 1% of their memory. That
makes a whole year seem to fly by! Even faster than when you were 50.
That's the scientific reason why time *really* does seem to go
faster as we get older.
As for my original post, yes, the days really do get shorter quite
quickly this time of year . . . right now we are losing about 3 minutes
of daylight until we hit the shortest day of the year. Then the days
start to get longer . . . :-)
I have pneumonia at the moment and the days are not going fast enough
:( I've coughed so much, I am scared to cough now, all the muscles
around the diaphragm are sore and angry. Just think Bette Davis, she
was the one who said 'Old age is no place for sissies' - so right !
Mike Spencer
2017-09-23 06:15:59 UTC
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Post by l***@fl.it
I have pneumonia at the moment and the days are not going fast enough
:( I've coughed so much, I am scared to cough now, all the muscles
around the diaphragm are sore and angry.
Sorry to hear it. Best wishes.

Peggy & I both had an upper respiratory, paroxysmal coughing thing
back in April that hung on for two months. Happily no lung
involvement but she was coughing so badly one night that I dragged her
off to the ER for big bore meds to suppress it.

I now have to reschedule her April birthday party for October. :-\
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
l***@fl.it
2017-09-23 11:53:16 UTC
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On 23 Sep 2017 03:15:59 -0300, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
Post by l***@fl.it
I have pneumonia at the moment and the days are not going fast enough
:( I've coughed so much, I am scared to cough now, all the muscles
around the diaphragm are sore and angry.
Sorry to hear it. Best wishes.
Peggy & I both had an upper respiratory, paroxysmal coughing thing
back in April that hung on for two months. Happily no lung
involvement but she was coughing so badly one night that I dragged her
off to the ER for big bore meds to suppress it.
I now have to reschedule her April birthday party for October. :-\
That's depressing! This time I caught it in time, there is a subtle
difference between a cold/cough and something more drastic. Last time
about three years ago I thought I was being a wimp and didn't go to
the doc but this time as soon as I had a 'full' feeling in the lung I
decided to go quickly. So the antibiotics started working on it far
sooner. So you two should not be hesitant if it comes around again.

I keep Bette Davis in mind, she said 'Old age is no place for sissies'
how bloody right :)
jvangurp
2017-09-24 12:09:15 UTC
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Oh dear, hope you feel better soon!

John
Wayne Hines
2017-09-26 10:06:31 UTC
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I have pneumonia at the moment and the days are not going fast enough :(
I've coughed so much, I am scared to cough now, all the muscles around
the diaphragm are sore and angry. Just think Bette Davis, she was the
one who said 'Old age is no place for sissies' - so right !
That's not good. I hope you're getting over it.

gwh
--
I used to care but things have changed.
jvangurp
2017-09-24 12:10:25 UTC
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Pretty sure today has 24 hours just like yesterday, and tomorrow. ;-)
John
HRM Resident
2017-09-24 12:44:23 UTC
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Post by jvangurp
Pretty sure today has 24 hours just like yesterday, and tomorrow. ;-)
John
Not really! The exact day length for Sunday, 24 September, 2017 is
24 hours, 0 minutes, 0.0008218 seconds (0.8218 milliseconds) and
yesterday's was 24 hours, 0 minutes, 0.0009389 seconds (0.9389
milliseconds).

On average, a mean solar day in the last 365 days was 1.12 ms over
24 hours, so today's day length is below average. Over this period, 265
days have been longer than today, while 101 have been shorter than today.

Not that it matters . . . :-)
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HRM Resident
jvangurp
2017-09-25 11:58:38 UTC
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Yeah but 184 seconds?

John
HRM Resident
2017-09-25 12:13:23 UTC
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Post by jvangurp
Yeah but 184 seconds?
John
That's right. 184 seconds less DAYLIGHT than the day before . . .
and the rate of is always changing. Today (25 Sept) has 185 seconds (3
minutes and 5 seconds) less daylight than yesterday. It's how it works.
The change in the amount of daylight is not linear.

The first day of the season of autumn - and the beginning of a long
period of darkness at the North Pole. In the northern hemisphere it's
late September. That's when the fastest rate of change happens . . .
and we just are there.

Think of it as a pendulum swinging back and forth. The maximum
speed is when the pendulum is near the vertical position where we are
now . . . and it's very slow as it reaches the top of the arc on either
end (on 21 December and 21 June.)
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HRM Resident
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