Discussion:
Sushi?
(too old to reply)
HRM Resident
2017-08-17 11:37:25 UTC
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Why do people eat that stuff? I can't understand the attraction of
raw fish wrapped in seaweed. It'd be much better if it were cooked beef
wrapped in pie crust . . . like a meat pie! Sushi = ugh!
--
HRM Resident
l***@fl.it
2017-08-17 11:53:09 UTC
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On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 08:37:25 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Why do people eat that stuff? I can't understand the attraction of
raw fish wrapped in seaweed. It'd be much better if it were cooked beef
wrapped in pie crust . . . like a meat pie! Sushi = ugh!
Love sushi - my younger daughter and I often treat ourselves.
HRM Resident
2017-08-17 12:03:55 UTC
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Post by l***@fl.it
On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 08:37:25 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Why do people eat that stuff? I can't understand the attraction of
raw fish wrapped in seaweed. It'd be much better if it were cooked beef
wrapped in pie crust . . . like a meat pie! Sushi = ugh!
Love sushi - my younger daughter and I often treat ourselves.
I'm sorry to hear that! Have you tried seeing a diet councillor or
a therapist? You ought not be eating raw fish! :-)
--
HRM Resident
l***@fl.it
2017-08-17 12:37:48 UTC
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On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 09:03:55 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Post by l***@fl.it
On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 08:37:25 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Why do people eat that stuff? I can't understand the attraction of
raw fish wrapped in seaweed. It'd be much better if it were cooked beef
wrapped in pie crust . . . like a meat pie! Sushi = ugh!
Love sushi - my younger daughter and I often treat ourselves.
I'm sorry to hear that! Have you tried seeing a diet councillor or
a therapist? You ought not be eating raw fish! :-)
With my extremely good health I could do an ad for it! Even had
puffer fish in Japan and survived.
HRM Resident
2017-08-18 10:57:28 UTC
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Post by l***@fl.it
On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 09:03:55 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Post by l***@fl.it
On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 08:37:25 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Why do people eat that stuff? I can't understand the attraction of
raw fish wrapped in seaweed. It'd be much better if it were cooked beef
wrapped in pie crust . . . like a meat pie! Sushi = ugh!
Love sushi - my younger daughter and I often treat ourselves.
I'm sorry to hear that! Have you tried seeing a diet councillor or
a therapist? You ought not be eating raw fish! :-)
With my extremely good health I could do an ad for it! Even had
puffer fish in Japan and survived.
Well, I wouldn't think it's necessarily good health. Likely your
system has a high resistance to bacteria and viruses, etc! If you've
been eating a lot of fish that's "off" during your lifetime, as well as
other food that's gone bad, you likely have a very high resistance to
disease.

Kids today like their food clean and fresh. Sissies, I call'em!
You gotta eat a peck of dirt in your lifetime, I've always heard . . .
although I didn't think one was supposed to get it all from bad fish! :-)
--
HRM Resident
l***@fl.it
2017-08-18 13:23:42 UTC
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On Fri, 18 Aug 2017 07:57:28 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Post by l***@fl.it
On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 09:03:55 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Post by l***@fl.it
On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 08:37:25 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Why do people eat that stuff? I can't understand the attraction of
raw fish wrapped in seaweed. It'd be much better if it were cooked beef
wrapped in pie crust . . . like a meat pie! Sushi = ugh!
Love sushi - my younger daughter and I often treat ourselves.
I'm sorry to hear that! Have you tried seeing a diet councillor or
a therapist? You ought not be eating raw fish! :-)
With my extremely good health I could do an ad for it! Even had
puffer fish in Japan and survived.
Well, I wouldn't think it's necessarily good health. Likely your
system has a high resistance to bacteria and viruses, etc! If you've
been eating a lot of fish that's "off" during your lifetime, as well as
other food that's gone bad, you likely have a very high resistance to
disease.
Kids today like their food clean and fresh. Sissies, I call'em!
You gotta eat a peck of dirt in your lifetime, I've always heard . . .
although I didn't think one was supposed to get it all from bad fish! :-)
A couple of years ago I heard the boffins start to mutter that all
this 'sanitizing' is too much, and now I hear they are curing kids
with peanut allergies with peanuts, go figger.
jvangurp
2017-08-17 14:58:42 UTC
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Post by HRM Resident
Why do people eat that stuff? I can't understand the attraction of
raw fish wrapped in seaweed. It'd be much better if it were cooked beef
wrapped in pie crust . . . like a meat pie! Sushi = ugh!
--
HRM Resident
I used to savour it while at the same time recognizing the inherent risk in eating raw seafood. Now as a strict vegetarian I eat it only with non-meat stuff and I still find it delicious. Dipping those yummy things in soy sauce with wasabi is just completely yum!

Maybe you've had only boring and/or crappy sushi? Well it really doesn't matter does it? There's no reason you should ever eat it if you prefer not to :-)
HRM Resident
2017-08-18 11:21:50 UTC
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Post by jvangurp
Post by HRM Resident
Why do people eat that stuff? I can't understand the attraction of
raw fish wrapped in seaweed. It'd be much better if it were cooked beef
wrapped in pie crust . . . like a meat pie! Sushi = ugh!
--
HRM Resident
I used to savour it while at the same time recognizing the inherent risk in eating raw seafood. Now as a strict vegetarian I eat it only with non-meat stuff and I still find it delicious. Dipping those yummy things in soy sauce with wasabi is just completely yum!
Maybe you've had only boring and/or crappy sushi? Well it really doesn't matter does it? There's no reason you should ever eat it if you prefer not to :-)
I'd drive you nuts! I won't try anything "new." I grow most of my
own veggies (potatoes, carrots, parsnip, turnips, etc.) And I eat fresh
fish, well cooked. Normal fish like haddock, halibut, salmon, etc. No
puffers or lion fish or ugly things with spikes, fangs and big bright
coloured prongs sticking out of them like porcupines!

Also a lot of beef, chicken and pork . . . ALL free range. Boiled
dinner (corned beef with lots of cabbage, potatoes and root vegetables),
spare ribs and sauerkraut, roast chicken, bacon and eggs every couple of
weeks, whole milk (none of that 1% or skim) and we make our own ice
cream. There's very little processed food that is eaten here. Zero GM
products if I can determine what's what . . . there's no law in Canada
that requires GM to be labelled like there is in the USA. That's being
worked on by Health Canada right now.

As regards to sushi, I know it's the "in" thing and has been for
years among many. My kids love it. However, I'm old school and I grew
up eating what I described above. I went through the "cook it fast,
order lots of pizza, get lots of that processed stuff in the
supermarket, etc" phase when I had to feed 4 kids. In the past decade
we've gone back to eating what we were fed in the 50s and 60s by our
parents (who lived into their 90s, likely because of good genes, not
their diet.) I won't eat raw meat or fish . . . it's simply gross.

I'd rather have salt herring and potatoes (and yes, I grew up
eating that too) instead of sushi. Lots of bones in herring, and if you
par-boil them several times you get rid of a lot of the salt. I must
admit I don't eat that now because I don't want to eat 3-4 tablespoons
of salt in a sitting, for no matter how much you par-boil them, you
still leave much of it in their.

You want to feel really good in the morning, try this. Work really
hard on a Saturday doing something you are not used to so you'll be
really muscle sore the next day. Then have a double feed of salt
herring and potatoes around 6 PM and knock off a quart of black rum and
don't go to bed until 1 AM. Set the alarm for 5:30 AM and get up and
tackle splitting several cords of hardwood. I did that once when I was
about 25! I think I'd rather have a lung transplant with no anaesthetic
than do that ever again. I can't recall even having a single drink of
rum since! And I have electric heat now as well. One learns from one's
mistakes! :-)
--
HRM Resident
l***@fl.it
2017-08-18 13:26:53 UTC
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On Fri, 18 Aug 2017 08:21:50 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Post by jvangurp
Post by HRM Resident
Why do people eat that stuff? I can't understand the attraction of
raw fish wrapped in seaweed. It'd be much better if it were cooked beef
wrapped in pie crust . . . like a meat pie! Sushi = ugh!
--
HRM Resident
I used to savour it while at the same time recognizing the inherent risk in eating raw seafood. Now as a strict vegetarian I eat it only with non-meat stuff and I still find it delicious. Dipping those yummy things in soy sauce with wasabi is just completely yum!
Maybe you've had only boring and/or crappy sushi? Well it really doesn't matter does it? There's no reason you should ever eat it if you prefer not to :-)
I'd drive you nuts! I won't try anything "new." I grow most of my
own veggies (potatoes, carrots, parsnip, turnips, etc.) And I eat fresh
fish, well cooked. Normal fish like haddock, halibut, salmon, etc. No
puffers or lion fish or ugly things with spikes, fangs and big bright
coloured prongs sticking out of them like porcupines!
Also a lot of beef, chicken and pork . . . ALL free range. Boiled
dinner (corned beef with lots of cabbage, potatoes and root vegetables),
spare ribs and sauerkraut, roast chicken, bacon and eggs every couple of
weeks, whole milk (none of that 1% or skim) and we make our own ice
cream. There's very little processed food that is eaten here. Zero GM
products if I can determine what's what . . . there's no law in Canada
that requires GM to be labelled like there is in the USA. That's being
worked on by Health Canada right now.
As regards to sushi, I know it's the "in" thing and has been for
years among many. My kids love it. However, I'm old school and I grew
up eating what I described above. I went through the "cook it fast,
order lots of pizza, get lots of that processed stuff in the
supermarket, etc" phase when I had to feed 4 kids. In the past decade
we've gone back to eating what we were fed in the 50s and 60s by our
parents (who lived into their 90s, likely because of good genes, not
their diet.) I won't eat raw meat or fish . . . it's simply gross.
I'd rather have salt herring and potatoes (and yes, I grew up
eating that too) instead of sushi. Lots of bones in herring, and if you
par-boil them several times you get rid of a lot of the salt. I must
admit I don't eat that now because I don't want to eat 3-4 tablespoons
of salt in a sitting, for no matter how much you par-boil them, you
still leave much of it in their.
You want to feel really good in the morning, try this. Work really
hard on a Saturday doing something you are not used to so you'll be
really muscle sore the next day. Then have a double feed of salt
herring and potatoes around 6 PM and knock off a quart of black rum and
don't go to bed until 1 AM. Set the alarm for 5:30 AM and get up and
tackle splitting several cords of hardwood. I did that once when I was
about 25! I think I'd rather have a lung transplant with no anaesthetic
than do that ever again. I can't recall even having a single drink of
rum since! And I have electric heat now as well. One learns from one's
mistakes! :-)
Being Scottish all the bones in herring are no problem. You are not
serving it right, there is a process when you clean the fish where it
is simple to remove 99% of the bones as you fillet it. I also love
pickled herring or Solomon Gundy - that's not cooked either, must be
the cannibal in me.
HRM Resident
2017-08-18 18:09:53 UTC
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Post by l***@fl.it
On Fri, 18 Aug 2017 08:21:50 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Post by jvangurp
Post by HRM Resident
Why do people eat that stuff? I can't understand the attraction of
raw fish wrapped in seaweed. It'd be much better if it were cooked beef
wrapped in pie crust . . . like a meat pie! Sushi = ugh!
--
HRM Resident
I used to savour it while at the same time recognizing the inherent risk in eating raw seafood. Now as a strict vegetarian I eat it only with non-meat stuff and I still find it delicious. Dipping those yummy things in soy sauce with wasabi is just completely yum!
Maybe you've had only boring and/or crappy sushi? Well it really doesn't matter does it? There's no reason you should ever eat it if you prefer not to :-)
I'd drive you nuts! I won't try anything "new." I grow most of my
own veggies (potatoes, carrots, parsnip, turnips, etc.) And I eat fresh
fish, well cooked. Normal fish like haddock, halibut, salmon, etc. No
puffers or lion fish or ugly things with spikes, fangs and big bright
coloured prongs sticking out of them like porcupines!
Also a lot of beef, chicken and pork . . . ALL free range. Boiled
dinner (corned beef with lots of cabbage, potatoes and root vegetables),
spare ribs and sauerkraut, roast chicken, bacon and eggs every couple of
weeks, whole milk (none of that 1% or skim) and we make our own ice
cream. There's very little processed food that is eaten here. Zero GM
products if I can determine what's what . . . there's no law in Canada
that requires GM to be labelled like there is in the USA. That's being
worked on by Health Canada right now.
As regards to sushi, I know it's the "in" thing and has been for
years among many. My kids love it. However, I'm old school and I grew
up eating what I described above. I went through the "cook it fast,
order lots of pizza, get lots of that processed stuff in the
supermarket, etc" phase when I had to feed 4 kids. In the past decade
we've gone back to eating what we were fed in the 50s and 60s by our
parents (who lived into their 90s, likely because of good genes, not
their diet.) I won't eat raw meat or fish . . . it's simply gross.
I'd rather have salt herring and potatoes (and yes, I grew up
eating that too) instead of sushi. Lots of bones in herring, and if you
par-boil them several times you get rid of a lot of the salt. I must
admit I don't eat that now because I don't want to eat 3-4 tablespoons
of salt in a sitting, for no matter how much you par-boil them, you
still leave much of it in their.
You want to feel really good in the morning, try this. Work really
hard on a Saturday doing something you are not used to so you'll be
really muscle sore the next day. Then have a double feed of salt
herring and potatoes around 6 PM and knock off a quart of black rum and
don't go to bed until 1 AM. Set the alarm for 5:30 AM and get up and
tackle splitting several cords of hardwood. I did that once when I was
about 25! I think I'd rather have a lung transplant with no anaesthetic
than do that ever again. I can't recall even having a single drink of
rum since! And I have electric heat now as well. One learns from one's
mistakes! :-)
Being Scottish all the bones in herring are no problem. You are not
serving it right, there is a process when you clean the fish where it
is simple to remove 99% of the bones as you fillet it. I also love
pickled herring or Solomon Gundy - that's not cooked either, must be
the cannibal in me.
That's a different kettle of fish! (Ha ha.) It's good and I think
they put enough vinegar in Solomon Gundy to either soften or dissolve
the bones. Really good stuff and I too have been eating that since I
can remember.

Here's the scoop on "salt herring" when I was young. In the fall
my father (and uncles and almost everyone else in the village) got a
5-gallon bucket of fresh herring from the local fishermen for next to
nothing. Probably a cent each. They cleaned the innards out. Then
they went into a large wooden cask with about an inch of salt on the
bottom. You fill up the gutted insides of each herring and layer them
on top of the salt. Then add another inch of salt, and another layer of
herring . . . keep going until the cask is full. Then get a board more
or less the size of the cask, put a big rock on it and store it in the
cellar. I'm talking a dirt floor cellar in those 150 year old houses,
full of bugs, spiders and lots of other crawly things. That cask sat in
the cellar for a whole year . . . after a few months you go down with a
pot and a fork and spear a couple of those herring out, and shake off as
much salt as you can. Put the board and rock back.

Up on the wood stove, boil a pot of water and put in the herring.
Boil for a few minutes, and toss the water. Repeat 3 times. That gets
enough salt out that you can get them down without gagging. Add 4-5
potatoes and boil for 20-25 minutes. Serve! Yum! Everything tastes
like salt and herring oil.

A tad different than filleted fish or Solomon Gundy . . .

That said, fresh herring, properly filleted and fried in bacon fat
is probably the best meal you can have. The problem was, with no
freezer, salting them was the only way to keep them for 10-12 months.
That was the old way when I grew up . . . I doubt if anyone salts
herring like than these days. Possibly a few for nostalgia reasons, but
it's one gross meal . . .

It's probably something my drunken Irish ancestors learned in
Ireland before they had to get out in 1845-1850 because of the potato
famine and the British/Scottish Presbyterian land owners who were happy
to let 2.5 million starve to death and another 2.5 million emigrate
elsewhere. :-)

I use that analogy when I hear the anti-Muslim rhetoric . . . as
recently as 100-125 years ago signs in stores across North America said
"Help Wanted - No Irish Need Apply." Racism and bigotry are an unending
scourge amongst our species. Seems to me every 1st and 2nd generation
immigrants are treated the same, regardless if it's 2017, 1957, 1917,
1857, etc. Most people don't like change and blame every problem they
encounter on immigrants and minorities.

Seems like this thread is drifting. I got to go check on my
herring and potatoes! :-)
--
HRM Resident
l***@fl.it
2017-08-18 19:04:34 UTC
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On Fri, 18 Aug 2017 15:09:53 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
That said, fresh herring, properly filleted and fried in bacon fat
is probably the best meal you can have. The problem was, with no
freezer, salting them was the only way to keep them for 10-12 months.
That was the old way when I grew up . . . I doubt if anyone salts
herring like than these days. Possibly a few for nostalgia reasons, but
it's one gross meal . . .
It's probably something my drunken Irish ancestors learned in
Ireland before they had to get out in 1845-1850 because of the potato
famine and the British/Scottish Presbyterian land owners who were happy
to let 2.5 million starve to death and another 2.5 million emigrate
elsewhere. :-)
You don't know Scottish history or you would know how Nova Scotia came
to be. I don't think any Scottish landowners were over in Ireland.
Post by HRM Resident
I use that analogy when I hear the anti-Muslim rhetoric . . . as
recently as 100-125 years ago signs in stores across North America said
"Help Wanted - No Irish Need Apply." Racism and bigotry are an unending
scourge amongst our species. Seems to me every 1st and 2nd generation
immigrants are treated the same, regardless if it's 2017, 1957, 1917,
1857, etc. Most people don't like change and blame every problem they
encounter on immigrants and minorities.
Seems like this thread is drifting. I got to go check on my
herring and potatoes! :-)
Someone asked me (nastily, thought he was being smart) yesterday, 'You
an immigrant?' and I replied with great pride, yes, fifty years ago
this year! The others were interested in why/how we came here etc and
he was spitting bricks :)

A friend and I take great delight when people ask her how long she has
been in Halifax (she is visibly of Chinese origin) and she responds
she is a fifth generation Haligonian then adds, you asked the wrong
one, ask her! It amazes me how often it happens, the assumption she
must be a recent newcomer.
HRM Resident
2017-08-18 19:22:00 UTC
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Post by l***@fl.it
On Fri, 18 Aug 2017 15:09:53 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
That said, fresh herring, properly filleted and fried in bacon fat
is probably the best meal you can have. The problem was, with no
freezer, salting them was the only way to keep them for 10-12 months.
That was the old way when I grew up . . . I doubt if anyone salts
herring like than these days. Possibly a few for nostalgia reasons, but
it's one gross meal . . .
It's probably something my drunken Irish ancestors learned in
Ireland before they had to get out in 1845-1850 because of the potato
famine and the British/Scottish Presbyterian land owners who were happy
to let 2.5 million starve to death and another 2.5 million emigrate
elsewhere. :-)
You don't know Scottish history or you would know how Nova Scotia came
to be. I don't think any Scottish landowners were over in Ireland.
I know how Nova Scotia came to be. I don't know a lot of Scottish
history, but I do know quite a bit about Irish history:

<http://www.ulsterscotssociety.com/about.html>

The above describes what I was referring to . . . the British
government wanted to increase the protestant population in Ireland and
made it very attractive for roughly 200,000 Presbyterians to leave
Lowland Scotland for Northern Ireland from 1608-1697.

If you want a little more "fiction" and less "dry history" to
describe this (and a lot more) read Trinity by Leon Uris. It's pretty
much historically accurate as far as I can tell, but has fictional
characters weaved in to make it a novel.
Post by l***@fl.it
Post by HRM Resident
I use that analogy when I hear the anti-Muslim rhetoric . . . as
recently as 100-125 years ago signs in stores across North America said
"Help Wanted - No Irish Need Apply." Racism and bigotry are an unending
scourge amongst our species. Seems to me every 1st and 2nd generation
immigrants are treated the same, regardless if it's 2017, 1957, 1917,
1857, etc. Most people don't like change and blame every problem they
encounter on immigrants and minorities.
Seems like this thread is drifting. I got to go check on my
herring and potatoes! :-)
Someone asked me (nastily, thought he was being smart) yesterday, 'You
an immigrant?' and I replied with great pride, yes, fifty years ago
this year! The others were interested in why/how we came here etc and
he was spitting bricks :)
A friend and I take great delight when people ask her how long she has
been in Halifax (she is visibly of Chinese origin) and she responds
she is a fifth generation Haligonian then adds, you asked the wrong
one, ask her! It amazes me how often it happens, the assumption she
must be a recent newcomer.
You? An immigrant? Well that explains why they cancelled the bus
route to Sambro, why the Bluenose refit went terribly wrong, why that
ferry from Yarmouth to Portland is frigged up, and just about every
other negative thing that's happening in Nova Scotia! :-)

(Just kidding . . . you obviously contributed, and are still
contributing, to making Canada the greatest county on Earth, as do 99.9%
of immigrants.)
--
HRM Resident
l***@fl.it
2017-08-18 20:54:00 UTC
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On Fri, 18 Aug 2017 16:22:00 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Post by l***@fl.it
On Fri, 18 Aug 2017 15:09:53 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
That said, fresh herring, properly filleted and fried in bacon fat
is probably the best meal you can have. The problem was, with no
freezer, salting them was the only way to keep them for 10-12 months.
That was the old way when I grew up . . . I doubt if anyone salts
herring like than these days. Possibly a few for nostalgia reasons, but
it's one gross meal . . .
It's probably something my drunken Irish ancestors learned in
Ireland before they had to get out in 1845-1850 because of the potato
famine and the British/Scottish Presbyterian land owners who were happy
to let 2.5 million starve to death and another 2.5 million emigrate
elsewhere. :-)
You don't know Scottish history or you would know how Nova Scotia came
to be. I don't think any Scottish landowners were over in Ireland.
I know how Nova Scotia came to be. I don't know a lot of Scottish
<http://www.ulsterscotssociety.com/about.html>
The above describes what I was referring to . . . the British
government wanted to increase the protestant population in Ireland and
made it very attractive for roughly 200,000 Presbyterians to leave
Lowland Scotland for Northern Ireland from 1608-1697.
Lowland Scotland would be the English transplants, not the true
Scottish.
Post by HRM Resident
If you want a little more "fiction" and less "dry history" to
describe this (and a lot more) read Trinity by Leon Uris. It's pretty
much historically accurate as far as I can tell, but has fictional
characters weaved in to make it a novel.
Post by l***@fl.it
Post by HRM Resident
I use that analogy when I hear the anti-Muslim rhetoric . . . as
recently as 100-125 years ago signs in stores across North America said
"Help Wanted - No Irish Need Apply." Racism and bigotry are an unending
scourge amongst our species. Seems to me every 1st and 2nd generation
immigrants are treated the same, regardless if it's 2017, 1957, 1917,
1857, etc. Most people don't like change and blame every problem they
encounter on immigrants and minorities.
Seems like this thread is drifting. I got to go check on my
herring and potatoes! :-)
Someone asked me (nastily, thought he was being smart) yesterday, 'You
an immigrant?' and I replied with great pride, yes, fifty years ago
this year! The others were interested in why/how we came here etc and
he was spitting bricks :)
A friend and I take great delight when people ask her how long she has
been in Halifax (she is visibly of Chinese origin) and she responds
she is a fifth generation Haligonian then adds, you asked the wrong
one, ask her! It amazes me how often it happens, the assumption she
must be a recent newcomer.
You? An immigrant? Well that explains why they cancelled the bus
route to Sambro, why the Bluenose refit went terribly wrong, why that
ferry from Yarmouth to Portland is frigged up, and just about every
other negative thing that's happening in Nova Scotia! :-)
Wow, I am flattered!
Post by HRM Resident
(Just kidding . . . you obviously contributed, and are still
contributing, to making Canada the greatest county on Earth, as do 99.9%
of immigrants.)
We tried to do our bit and one of my uncles accused me of being like a
Roman Catholic, more bigoted for being converted than born :)
Mike Spencer
2017-08-19 04:59:06 UTC
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Post by HRM Resident
Seems like this thread is drifting. I got to go check on my
herring and potatoes! :-)
So how are you on okra? Crawfish gumbo?
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
HRM Resident
2017-08-20 12:33:17 UTC
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Post by Mike Spencer
Post by HRM Resident
Seems like this thread is drifting. I got to go check on my
herring and potatoes! :-)
So how are you on okra? Crawfish gumbo?
Orka? I had to look that up, Mike. Sounds gross to eat, but the
health benefits expounded on the sites I found are indeed interesting. I
never heard of it before, and the description "some people eat it
breaded and fried but it honestly is the only veggie I can think of that
tastes like something you shouldn't put in your mouth in polite company"
isn't appealing. Sounds like haggis. Either you have to spit it out or
barf it up in my experience! :-) That really occurred to a family
member in Stirling, Scotland in 2009. It got spit out. I had better
sense, knowing what haggis was made from, so I ordered something made
for people to eat. :-)

Crawfish gumbo? I might try that, although one of the ingredients
I found in most recipes is orka! From what I can tell gumbo is like
menudo and goulash. Regionally different terms for the "throw that in
there" stew.

Unrelated I made a triangle dinner bell yesterday. I used 3/8"
square stock and put a nice twist in the bottom. Rings pretty well and
looks OK. Now I gotta find a cook-house on a ranch to hang it on! LOL!

Quick question . . . I seasoned it with just canola oil (no
turpentine, beaswax, etc.) It's nice and black like one of those cast
iron frying pans. How well should that stand up to rusting outside? I
know that type of "protection" isn't as good as paint or galvanizing,
but would it last a year or two in our NS climate without turning all
reddish-brown?
--
HRM Resident
l***@fl.it
2017-08-20 12:54:47 UTC
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On Sun, 20 Aug 2017 09:33:17 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
Post by Mike Spencer
Post by HRM Resident
Seems like this thread is drifting. I got to go check on my
herring and potatoes! :-)
So how are you on okra? Crawfish gumbo?
Orka? I had to look that up, Mike. Sounds gross to eat, but the
health benefits expounded on the sites I found are indeed interesting. I
never heard of it before, and the description "some people eat it
breaded and fried but it honestly is the only veggie I can think of that
tastes like something you shouldn't put in your mouth in polite company"
isn't appealing. Sounds like haggis. Either you have to spit it out or
barf it up in my experience! :-) That really occurred to a family
member in Stirling, Scotland in 2009. It got spit out. I had better
sense, knowing what haggis was made from, so I ordered something made
for people to eat. :-)
Loathe okra (dunno about orka) I find it is a love/hate veggie, nobody
seems abivalent about it. Haggis is good when properly made,
actually has little flavour and is kin to meat loaf.
Post by HRM Resident
Crawfish gumbo? I might try that, although one of the ingredients
I found in most recipes is orka! From what I can tell gumbo is like
menudo and goulash. Regionally different terms for the "throw that in
there" stew.
Unrelated I made a triangle dinner bell yesterday. I used 3/8"
square stock and put a nice twist in the bottom. Rings pretty well and
looks OK. Now I gotta find a cook-house on a ranch to hang it on! LOL!
Quick question . . . I seasoned it with just canola oil (no
turpentine, beaswax, etc.) It's nice and black like one of those cast
iron frying pans. How well should that stand up to rusting outside? I
know that type of "protection" isn't as good as paint or galvanizing,
but would it last a year or two in our NS climate without turning all
reddish-brown?
I don't mind reddish-brown in preference to newly forged.
HRM Resident
2017-08-20 15:27:56 UTC
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Post by l***@fl.it
On Sun, 20 Aug 2017 09:33:17 -0300, HRM Resident
snipped for brevity<
Post by HRM Resident
Unrelated I made a triangle dinner bell yesterday. I used 3/8"
square stock and put a nice twist in the bottom. Rings pretty well and
looks OK. Now I gotta find a cook-house on a ranch to hang it on!
LOL!
Quick question . . . I seasoned it with just canola oil (no
turpentine, beaswax, etc.) It's nice and black like one of those cast
iron frying pans. How well should that stand up to rusting outside?
I know that type of "protection" isn't as good as paint or
galvanizing,
but would it last a year or two in our NS climate without turning all
reddish-brown?
I don't mind reddish-brown in preference to newly forged.
I would be OK with the reddish-brown rusty colour . . . even if it
rusts like bare metal it will last longer than me.

It's pretty much black, not the newly forged look. Newly forged is
essentially bare steel and would rust overnight just from the dew. The
traditional way to protect forged steel and iron is to get it hot
(300-400 F) and wipe it down with a "secret" mixture of turpentine,
beeswax, linseed oil, etc. The exact proportions are the "secret" and I
think every smith uses a slightly different portion of each. I don't
think it makes a lot of difference. The "secret" is likely more related
to the skill and eye of the smith applying it than to the portions of
the ingredients.

I took a short cut and used an old towel soaked in dirty canola oil
I'd used to heat treat a few knives . . . that seems to work it's way
into the metal a bit and the resultant item looks almost like it was
pained black. Another smith with less experience than Mike Spencer told
me canola oil was just as good. Either way, it looks like one of those
old cast iron frying pans you have to season with oil or fat in the oven
occasionally. I'm guessing it will last better than bare metal, but
will eventually wear off or allow water to come in contact with the iron
molecules and oxidize.

I'll wait for Mike to show up and see what he thinks about
longevity, seeing as I took a short cut. It really doesn't matter if it
rusts or not . . . I'm just making things to learn the tricks of the
trade . . . and I have a hell of a ways to go!

I would be OK with the reddish-brown rusty colour . . . even if it
rusts like bare metal it will last longer than me.

It's pretty much black, not the newly forged look. Newly forged is
essentially bare steel and would rust overnight just from the dew. The
traditional way to protect forged steel and iron is to get it hot
(300-400 F) and wipe it down with a "secret" mixture of turpentine,
beeswax, linseed oil, etc. The exact proportions are the "secret" and I
think every smith uses a slightly different portion of each. I don't
think it makes a lot of difference. The "secret" is likely more related
to the skill and eye of the smith applying it than to the portions of
the ingredients.

I took a short cut and used an old towel soaked in dirty canola oil
I'd used to heat treat a few knives . . . that seems to work it's way
into the metal a bit and the resultant item looks almost like it was
pained black. Another smith with less experience than Mike Spencer told
me canola oil was just as good. Either way, it looks like one of those
old cast iron frying pans you have to season with oil or fat in the oven
occasionally. I'm guessing it will last better than bare metal, but
will eventually wear off or allow water to come in contact with the iron
molecules and oxidize.

I'll wait for Mike to show up and see what he thinks about
longevity, seeing as I took a short cut. It really doesn't matter if it
rusts or not . . . I'm just making things to learn the tricks of the
trade . . . and I have a hell of a ways to go!
--
HRM Resident
Mike Spencer
2017-08-20 21:05:45 UTC
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The traditional way to protect forged steel and iron is to get it
hot (300-400 F) and wipe it down with a "secret" mixture of
turpentine, beeswax, linseed oil, etc. The exact proportions are
the "secret" and I think every smith uses a slightly different
portion of each. I don't think it makes a lot of difference. The
"secret" is likely more related to the skill and eye of the smith
applying it than to the portions of the ingredients.
Just so. Other "secret" variations -- adding graphite, using carnauba
wax either melted-on or with a solvent, adding artist's cobalt dryer
etc. -- were only secret before blacksmiths began talking to each other
globally, publishing books on smithing and using the internet.
I'll wait for Mike to show up and see what he thinks about
longevity...
See previous post.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
HRM Resident
2017-08-21 17:22:24 UTC
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Post by Mike Spencer
The traditional way to protect forged steel and iron is to get it
hot (300-400 F) and wipe it down with a "secret" mixture of
turpentine, beeswax, linseed oil, etc. The exact proportions are
the "secret" and I think every smith uses a slightly different
portion of each. I don't think it makes a lot of difference. The
"secret" is likely more related to the skill and eye of the smith
applying it than to the portions of the ingredients.
Just so. Other "secret" variations -- adding graphite, using carnauba
wax either melted-on or with a solvent, adding artist's cobalt dryer
etc. -- were only secret before blacksmiths began talking to each other
globally, publishing books on smithing and using the internet.
I'll wait for Mike to show up and see what he thinks about
longevity...
See previous post.
Thanks, Mike. Sort of what I thought. As soon as we get a cool
day I'll burn off the canola oil and re-do it with linseed, turpentine
and carnauba wax (which I have on hand, thanks to your suggestion last
winter.) Not doing any forging today . . . it's over 28 C here now and
humid.
--
HRM Resident
Mike Spencer
2017-08-21 22:11:35 UTC
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Post by HRM Resident
Not doing any forging today . . . it's over 28 C here now and
humid.
Me neither. Had a teenager from Ontario visit who has been learning
smithing for a couple of years, making jewelry, clever cheese knives
and more. We didn't start a fire though.

Harvesting ripe tomatoes, broccoli. I'l split a little wood just
before sundown when it's cooler.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
HRM Resident
2017-08-22 18:20:00 UTC
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Post by Mike Spencer
Post by HRM Resident
Not doing any forging today . . . it's over 28 C here now and
humid.
Me neither. Had a teenager from Ontario visit who has been learning
smithing for a couple of years, making jewelry, clever cheese knives
and more. We didn't start a fire though.
Harvesting ripe tomatoes, broccoli. I'l split a little wood just
before sundown when it's cooler.
I got about 35 lb potatoes . . . not my best effort! Tomatoes are
just starting to turn orange, so they have a little while to go. Sounds
like your garden is way ahead of mine. I got two "crops" of radish
already, but they grow fast and don't need hardly any attention. Beans
and peas are producing as well, so a far better year than last. Much
better growing season, for sure.

It's nice to be able to show your craft to visitors and relatives.
I wish I had the expertise to make stuff worth showing off, but I'm
still learning. I have 8-9 fireplace pokers if you want to buy one!
LOL! It took me that long to get "good" at it. I had a hell of a time
getting the forge weld to work on the front, but now it's one smack and
it gives that little "pop" and you know you've got it. Coal sure beats
propane for most things, although the gas forge is handy for small/quick
jobs and gets things hot enough to move the steel.

I gave up on the electric welder . . . costs almost twice as much
to upgrade my shed's 240 VAC wiring than it does to buy a Lincoln
AC-220! I'm sticking with flames . . . coal, propane and oxy-acetylene.
That all works A1 for my needs so far.
--
HRM Resident
Mike Spencer
2017-08-22 20:13:41 UTC
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Coal sure beats propane for most things, although the gas forge is
handy for small/quick jobs and gets things hot enough to move the
steel.
I agree. I didn't have a propane forge until a few years ago when we
built 20 at an MBA meet. It's just a small single-burner one but had
proved handy for small, quick jobs and for heat treating applications
that would have been impossible in the (or at least in my) coal forge.
I gave up on the electric welder . . . costs almost twice as much
to upgrade my shed's 240 VAC wiring than it does to buy a Lincoln
AC-220!
The place that the welder is most valuable for me is making
tooling. Yes, I've also used it in sculptural pieces where the welds
can be concealed -- e.g http://home.tallships.ca/mspencer/crab.html.
But a jig or fixture you can whack together in a few minutes or an
hour with the arc welder could take a day to make without it, or
otherwise would require lots of extra work or bother to accomplish the
goal without the jig.
I'm sticking with flames . . . coal, propane and oxy-acetylene.
I had just coal and oxy-acet for the first 8 or nine years. Excellent
discipline for learning. With an arc welder, you're always tempted to
solve a diffcult joining problem with electric glue instead of
figureing out a classical soution. The crab grill on this page:

http://home.tallships.ca/mspencer/gallery/sea-things.html

was done in my original shop [1], no electricity at all, just a rivet
forge and an aoxy-acet torch. It uses rivets, wrapped bindings,
mortice & tenon joins. With the fish grill on the same page, I
cheated and welded the fish to the seaweed.

But I'd hate to be without the arc welder now for the above reasons.


[1] http://home.tallships.ca/mspencer/temp/shed.html
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
jvangurp
2017-08-23 15:58:57 UTC
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Post by Mike Spencer
Coal sure beats propane for most things, although the gas forge is
handy for small/quick jobs and gets things hot enough to move the
steel.
I agree. I didn't have a propane forge until a few years ago when we
built 20 at an MBA meet. It's just a small single-burner one but had
proved handy for small, quick jobs and for heat treating applications
that would have been impossible in the (or at least in my) coal forge.
I gave up on the electric welder . . . costs almost twice as much
to upgrade my shed's 240 VAC wiring than it does to buy a Lincoln
AC-220!
The place that the welder is most valuable for me is making
tooling. Yes, I've also used it in sculptural pieces where the welds
can be concealed -- e.g http://home.tallships.ca/mspencer/crab.html.
But a jig or fixture you can whack together in a few minutes or an
hour with the arc welder could take a day to make without it, or
otherwise would require lots of extra work or bother to accomplish the
goal without the jig.
I'm sticking with flames . . . coal, propane and oxy-acetylene.
I had just coal and oxy-acet for the first 8 or nine years. Excellent
discipline for learning. With an arc welder, you're always tempted to
solve a diffcult joining problem with electric glue instead of
http://home.tallships.ca/mspencer/gallery/sea-things.html
was done in my original shop [1], no electricity at all, just a rivet
forge and an aoxy-acet torch. It uses rivets, wrapped bindings,
mortice & tenon joins. With the fish grill on the same page, I
cheated and welded the fish to the seaweed.
But I'd hate to be without the arc welder now for the above reasons.
[1] http://home.tallships.ca/mspencer/temp/shed.html
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
Just browsing your web page there Mike... by gum you made some stunning, beautiful work!

Cheers,
John
Mike Spencer
2017-08-24 18:46:10 UTC
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Post by jvangurp
Just browsing your web page there Mike... by gum you made some
stunning, beautiful work!
Thank you, John. Y'know, several pieces that I really like and am
proud of (including that crab) were made for people -- more often than
not with some personal significane to them -- who have since died.
And I have the lurking thought that the heirs, lacking that personal
connection (and maybe good taste as well :-) put my pieces out in the
yard sale with the mismatched flatware and the old venetian blinds.
And in another case, one guy has remarked more than once in public
venues how very much he and his late wife liked my piece but has
admitted privately (and abashedly) that he has misplaced or lost it.

Ho hum. Sic transit etc. etc. :-)
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
HRM Resident
2017-08-24 18:41:17 UTC
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Post by l***@fl.it
snipped for brevity<
Post by Mike Spencer
Post by HRM Resident
I'll wait for Mike to show up and see what he thinks about
longevity...
See previous post.
Thanks, Mike. Sort of what I thought. As soon as we get a cool
day I'll burn off the canola oil and re-do it with linseed, turpentine
and carnauba wax (which I have on hand, thanks to your suggestion last
winter.) Not doing any forging today . . . it's over 28 C here now and
humid.
I just did the above, Mike. I used beeswax instead of Carnauba,
and dissolved that in about a 50/50 mix of turpentine and raw linseed
oil. Looks better than the "quick and dirty" canola oil and has a bit
of a sheen. I'm confident that it will last a lot longer outside before
rusting as well.

Today I made my fire as per Jack Andrews' book . . . wet the coal
down and pack it against the sides of the firebox. Then a ball of
newspaper and a bit of kindling in the centre. I threw a small scoop of
green coal on top of the kindling and lit it with a slow blast. Hardly
any green smoke (as Andrews said) compared to just filling the firebox
with green coal and letting it burn off . . . I think the neighbours
must have thought I set my shed on fire earlier in the summer. Smoke
everywhere for 4-5 minutes. Even learning the proper way to light and
keep a fire going takes practice.

Made another poker and a few hooks . . . I think I have 10-11
pokers now! Time to move on to something else. Supposed to be cooler
for the next week . . . hopefully lower humidity too. From now to the
end of November is the best time of the year.
--
HRM Resident
Mike Spencer
2017-08-25 20:35:08 UTC
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Even learning the proper way to light and keep a [coal] fire going
takes practice.
Just so.
Made another poker and a few hooks . . . I think I have 10-11
pokers now! Time to move on to something else.
There are 317 documented ways to make a poker handle. ;-)
Supposed to be cooler for the next week . . . hopefully lower
humidity too. From now to the end of November is the best time of
the year.
Yes. See: http://bonmot.ca/~daniel/SixSeasons/

(The Piggies receipt has been updated. Omit the Brazil nuts; using
powdered sugar to avoid sticking and hasten firming up, knead a lot of
pecan halves into the fondant; separate into bite sized nodules making
sure each has at least one pecan; dip in chocolate. Even better than
the Brazil nut variant.)
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
Mike Spencer
2017-08-20 20:58:55 UTC
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Post by HRM Resident
Orka? I had to look that up, Mike.
Very much a US southern thing. In NS, I don't recall seeing fresh okra
in the produce section. Sometimes available in canned goods. My
mother grew up in Texas where it was a commonplace. Moreso in
Louisiana.
Post by HRM Resident
...honestly is the only veggie I can think of that tastes like
something you shouldn't put in your mouth in polite company...
Just so. Licking an ashtray or mistaking a dog turd for a sausage
probably tastes better.
Post by HRM Resident
Sounds like haggis.
Been to Burns Night, found the haggis, piped into the hall by a piper
in full regalia, perfectly palatable.
Post by HRM Resident
Crawfish gumbo? I might try that...
No, don't do that unless you're in the Louisiana Delta and striving
desperately to fit in. :-)
Post by HRM Resident
...although one of the ingredients I found in most recipes is okra!
Just so. Any "gumbo" is "Any" in an okra stew. Any gumbo has the
texture of slime-eel slime or what's found in a saloon spittoon.
Combined with the above-mentioned flavor, it's a world-class LOSE.
Post by HRM Resident
Quick question . . . I seasoned it with just canola oil (no
turpentine, beeswax, etc.) It's nice and black like one of those cast
iron frying pans. How well should that stand up to rusting outside?
Not well at all. The traditional finish is linseed oil, preferably
applied to the iron while it is still still too hot to touch
comfortably.

Linseed oil is a "drying oil", meaning that it polymerizes into a
tough natural plastic with exposure to air. That process is
accelerated by heat (or by chemical catalysts such as cobalt dryer).
This is the basis of "oil-based" paints (now replaced by alkyd resin
paint but still erroneously called "oil-based") and the artist's
paints used for centuries. See:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drying_oil

Tung oil is the only other commonly available drying oil, much
more costly than linseed.

Melting beeswax together with linseed oil, adding a little turpentine
to make the result softer, is also traditional. Neither that nor
plain linseed (with or without heat) will make a very durable outdoor
finish. You'll have to update the oil annually in NS weather. But
either will be far more durable than canola.
Post by HRM Resident
I know that type of "protection" isn't as good as paint or
galvanizing, but would it last a year or two in our NS climate
without turning all reddish-brown?
Linseed oil *is* essentially "paint" as it was know before the era of
modern polymer chemistry, viz. before 1950 or so. Adding graphite or
pigment improves durability by hindering the effect of UV on the
linseed polymer. Same for adding, as was commonplace, white or red
lead oxide with similar effect but you're not going to do that, are
you? :-o
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
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