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Scientific Analysis
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MYOB@home.com
2017-12-16 13:10:39 UTC
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Now if James were here, he would get a real hoot out of this. Actually, he'd probably take it VERY seriously.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/christmas-reindeer-santa-claus-biology-1.4448070
l***@fl.it
2017-12-16 13:50:28 UTC
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Post by ***@home.com
Now if James were here, he would get a real hoot out of this. Actually, he'd probably take it VERY seriously.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/christmas-reindeer-santa-claus-biology-1.4448070
We might do well to note the decreasing lichen though ...
Mike Spencer
2017-12-16 21:03:46 UTC
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Post by l***@fl.it
We might do well to note the decreasing lichen though ...
Excellent book by Frances Anderson (formerly with the NS library) on
NS lichen with many excellent photos. She spent years researching
it, lichen hunting all over the province.

When I first moved here in '69, I was struck bu how much lichen there
was in the woods, more than any place I'd been before except the more
remote parts of the White Mountains in New Hampshire, an area that has
been protected from destructive forces for many years, some of which
is still virgin forest because it was too inaccessible to the vast
and exploitive logging of 100 to 140 years ago.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
l***@fl.it
2017-12-16 21:25:12 UTC
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On 16 Dec 2017 17:03:46 -0400, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
Post by l***@fl.it
We might do well to note the decreasing lichen though ...
Excellent book by Frances Anderson (formerly with the NS library) on
NS lichen with many excellent photos. She spent years researching
it, lichen hunting all over the province.
When I first moved here in '69, I was struck bu how much lichen there
was in the woods, more than any place I'd been before except the more
remote parts of the White Mountains in New Hampshire, an area that has
been protected from destructive forces for many years, some of which
is still virgin forest because it was too inaccessible to the vast
and exploitive logging of 100 to 140 years ago.
I can't say I venture far into the woods these days but even a walk
around Frog Pond these days shows alarming changes. Some of it was
due to Juan it's true, but also, much is not. Hardly any lichen and
there was plenty years ago. I tried all this summer to find tadpoles
but didn't find one. In the late 70s I was there almost daily with my
dog and it swarmed with tadpoles.

Do we have any real forest left in NS? Flying in or out so much of it
is totally cut either side of any road.

Mike Spencer
2017-12-16 20:57:11 UTC
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Post by ***@home.com
Now if James were here, he would get a real hoot out of
this. Actually, he'd probably take it VERY seriously.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/christmas-reindeer-santa-claus-biology-1.4448070
From the article:

Andrew Hebda is a zoologist with the Nova Scotia Museum.

He is (or was) the go-to guy for tick research in NS.

Despite shedding some light on exactly who is pulling Santa's
sleigh, science still hasn't figured out the big question -- what
makes reindeer fly?

If you're a Terry Pratchett fan (or even if you're not) 'tis the
season to find the movie _Hogfather_ somewhere and watch it. Four
enormous draught-boars instead of "eight tiny reindeer". Some other
differences, as well, on Diskworld.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
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