Discussion:
History
(too old to reply)
Wayne Hines
2017-09-04 15:01:39 UTC
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An interesting opinion piece:

http://thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/1499773-opinion-your-ancestors-
deserve-far-more-respect-than-this
--
I used to care but things have changed.
l***@fl.it
2017-09-06 16:21:10 UTC
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On Mon, 04 Sep 2017 15:01:39 GMT, Wayne Hines
Post by Wayne Hines
http://thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/1499773-opinion-your-ancestors-
deserve-far-more-respect-than-this
They say it is not available, tried turning off my ad blocker but
still no luck.
Mike Spencer
2017-09-07 03:39:00 UTC
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Post by l***@fl.it
On Mon, 04 Sep 2017 15:01:39 GMT, Wayne Hines
Post by Wayne Hines
http://thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/1499773-opinion-your-ancestors-
deserve-far-more-respect-than-this
They say it is not available, tried turning off my ad blocker but
still no luck.
Got it with no hitches. Be sure to eliminate the '>' quoting
characters and whatever your system uses for a line break after
...ancestors- but keep the hyphen.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
l***@fl.it
2017-09-07 10:58:14 UTC
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On 07 Sep 2017 00:39:00 -0300, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
Post by l***@fl.it
On Mon, 04 Sep 2017 15:01:39 GMT, Wayne Hines
Post by Wayne Hines
http://thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/1499773-opinion-your-ancestors-
deserve-far-more-respect-than-this
They say it is not available, tried turning off my ad blocker but
still no luck.
Got it with no hitches. Be sure to eliminate the '>' quoting
characters and whatever your system uses for a line break after
...ancestors- but keep the hyphen.
Right, in the end I pasted it directly into FF and it opened. It says
basically what I feel, you can't go back and judge them by what we
think today. I always knew he ordered the price on their heads due
the massacre that took place on the settlers.

I think it is J V-G who gets mad with me when I say I can't quite see
the residential schools problem in the same light. I went to one of
those rigid English boarding schools which were considered the height
of eduction and very expensive. Even in my time, it was pretty
brutal. You would be amazed at the privations we endured.

I think the people who tried to run the residential schools, most
likely felt they were really providing the children with a great
education. Sure it was misguided and certainly any sexual content was
to be condemned. Also today, they would realise they should not try
to cut them off culturally.

I heard on BBC 4 the other day, not joking, there was talk about
whether Nelson should remain atop his tower in Trafalgar Square :(
Perhaps it's not the true meaning of 'those who forget history are
doomed to repeat it' but it seems similar.
jvangurp
2017-09-07 12:41:46 UTC
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Post by l***@fl.it
On 07 Sep 2017 00:39:00 -0300, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
Post by l***@fl.it
On Mon, 04 Sep 2017 15:01:39 GMT, Wayne Hines
Post by Wayne Hines
http://thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/1499773-opinion-your-ancestors-
deserve-far-more-respect-than-this
They say it is not available, tried turning off my ad blocker but
still no luck.
Got it with no hitches. Be sure to eliminate the '>' quoting
characters and whatever your system uses for a line break after
...ancestors- but keep the hyphen.
Right, in the end I pasted it directly into FF and it opened. It says
basically what I feel, you can't go back and judge them by what we
think today. I always knew he ordered the price on their heads due
the massacre that took place on the settlers.
I think it is J V-G who gets mad with me when I say I can't quite see
the residential schools problem in the same light. I went to one of
those rigid English boarding schools which were considered the height
of eduction and very expensive. Even in my time, it was pretty
brutal. You would be amazed at the privations we endured.
I think the people who tried to run the residential schools, most
likely felt they were really providing the children with a great
education. Sure it was misguided and certainly any sexual content was
to be condemned. Also today, they would realise they should not try
to cut them off culturally.
I heard on BBC 4 the other day, not joking, there was talk about
whether Nelson should remain atop his tower in Trafalgar Square :(
Perhaps it's not the true meaning of 'those who forget history are
doomed to repeat it' but it seems similar.
Yep, I see the residential schools as an actual planned program to eliminate native culture altogether, and they would have liked to actually exterminate them if they could get away with it, all under government direction. BUT that's a topic for another discussion thread.

Cheers,
John
l***@fl.it
2017-09-07 14:26:16 UTC
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Post by jvangurp
Post by l***@fl.it
On 07 Sep 2017 00:39:00 -0300, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
Post by l***@fl.it
On Mon, 04 Sep 2017 15:01:39 GMT, Wayne Hines
Post by Wayne Hines
http://thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/1499773-opinion-your-ancestors-
deserve-far-more-respect-than-this
They say it is not available, tried turning off my ad blocker but
still no luck.
Got it with no hitches. Be sure to eliminate the '>' quoting
characters and whatever your system uses for a line break after
...ancestors- but keep the hyphen.
Right, in the end I pasted it directly into FF and it opened. It says
basically what I feel, you can't go back and judge them by what we
think today. I always knew he ordered the price on their heads due
the massacre that took place on the settlers.
I think it is J V-G who gets mad with me when I say I can't quite see
the residential schools problem in the same light. I went to one of
those rigid English boarding schools which were considered the height
of eduction and very expensive. Even in my time, it was pretty
brutal. You would be amazed at the privations we endured.
I think the people who tried to run the residential schools, most
likely felt they were really providing the children with a great
education. Sure it was misguided and certainly any sexual content was
to be condemned. Also today, they would realise they should not try
to cut them off culturally.
I heard on BBC 4 the other day, not joking, there was talk about
whether Nelson should remain atop his tower in Trafalgar Square :(
Perhaps it's not the true meaning of 'those who forget history are
doomed to repeat it' but it seems similar.
Yep, I see the residential schools as an actual planned program to eliminate native culture altogether, and they would have liked to actually exterminate them if they could get away with it, all under government direction. BUT that's a topic for another discussion thread.
Cheers,
John
Perhaps the government did but I don't think the persons who came over
to try and provide a good education, necessarily thought that way.

It's so simplistic to look back and judge people by todays standards
and concepts.
jvangurp
2017-09-07 12:39:30 UTC
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Post by Wayne Hines
http://thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/1499773-opinion-your-ancestors-
deserve-far-more-respect-than-this
--
I used to care but things have changed.
I read that piece when it was published and it really stuck in my craw. Not sure who "we" is in the article... it sure isn't probably 90% of Haligonians. The "we" seems to be the original German settlers. Are they offended by the anti-Cornwallis sentiment? She didn't ask them. She's hanging her hat on the street layout and the buildings as being due to Corwallis? Man, that's a stretch. I find this a really shitty piece, and I wonder why she felt a need to speak up about it. Would like to read a critical analysis by someone who has a better grasp of the subject.

Thanks for sharing Wayne!

John
Mike Small
2017-09-11 15:14:58 UTC
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Post by jvangurp
Post by Wayne Hines
http://thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/1499773-opinion-your-ancestors-
deserve-far-more-respect-than-this
--
I used to care but things have changed.
I read that piece when it was published and it really stuck in my
craw. Not sure who "we" is in the article... it sure isn't probably
90% of Haligonians. The "we" seems to be the original German
settlers. Are they offended by the anti-Cornwallis sentiment? She
didn't ask them. She's hanging her hat on the street layout and the
buildings as being due to Corwallis? Man, that's a stretch. I find
this a really shitty piece, and I wonder why she felt a need to speak
up about it. Would like to read a critical analysis by someone who has
a better grasp of the subject.
Yeah, I'm having trouble figuring out who I should root for if I were to
turn time backwards given my foggy conception of who my ancestors
actually were. I think Small is probably Scottish, and my people quite
possibly ended up in the New World because of the Highland
Clearances. In which case, I should hate the English, right? But then
again some Smalls are English. On the other side of the family I have
Mersereaus. So maybe I should be for the French. Then again they were
supposedly Huguenots, so then again maybe I should hate the French. And
finally there's the rumour that we have some Mi'qmaq blood. Doesn't
sound like it's based on much of anything, so maybe I'm alright rooting
against the Mi'qmaq but maybe not.
--
Mike Small
***@sdf.org
l***@fl.it
2017-09-11 15:36:14 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Mike Small
Post by jvangurp
Post by Wayne Hines
http://thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/1499773-opinion-your-ancestors-
deserve-far-more-respect-than-this
--
I used to care but things have changed.
I read that piece when it was published and it really stuck in my
craw. Not sure who "we" is in the article... it sure isn't probably
90% of Haligonians. The "we" seems to be the original German
settlers. Are they offended by the anti-Cornwallis sentiment? She
didn't ask them. She's hanging her hat on the street layout and the
buildings as being due to Corwallis? Man, that's a stretch. I find
this a really shitty piece, and I wonder why she felt a need to speak
up about it. Would like to read a critical analysis by someone who has
a better grasp of the subject.
Yeah, I'm having trouble figuring out who I should root for if I were to
turn time backwards given my foggy conception of who my ancestors
actually were. I think Small is probably Scottish, and my people quite
possibly ended up in the New World because of the Highland
Clearances. In which case, I should hate the English, right? But then
again some Smalls are English. On the other side of the family I have
Mersereaus. So maybe I should be for the French. Then again they were
supposedly Huguenots, so then again maybe I should hate the French. And
finally there's the rumour that we have some Mi'qmaq blood. Doesn't
sound like it's based on much of anything, so maybe I'm alright rooting
against the Mi'qmaq but maybe not.
That's interesting, however my suggestion is you should know about the
Clearances and that many came here as a result etc etc. However you
drop me off when you say you 'should hate' - I feel this whole
caboodle is not whether the MM plundered and murdered and Cornwallis
then struck back, it's simply part of the history and cannot be judged
by todays standards because nothing is going to change it. In
desperate times maybe both sides did desperate things.
HRM Resident
2017-09-12 11:17:10 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by l***@fl.it
Post by Mike Small
Post by jvangurp
Post by Wayne Hines
http://thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/1499773-opinion-your-ancestors-
deserve-far-more-respect-than-this
--
I used to care but things have changed.
I read that piece when it was published and it really stuck in my
craw. Not sure who "we" is in the article... it sure isn't probably
90% of Haligonians. The "we" seems to be the original German
settlers. Are they offended by the anti-Cornwallis sentiment? She
didn't ask them. She's hanging her hat on the street layout and the
buildings as being due to Corwallis? Man, that's a stretch. I find
this a really shitty piece, and I wonder why she felt a need to speak
up about it. Would like to read a critical analysis by someone who has
a better grasp of the subject.
Yeah, I'm having trouble figuring out who I should root for if I were to
turn time backwards given my foggy conception of who my ancestors
actually were. I think Small is probably Scottish, and my people quite
possibly ended up in the New World because of the Highland
Clearances. In which case, I should hate the English, right? But then
again some Smalls are English. On the other side of the family I have
Mersereaus. So maybe I should be for the French. Then again they were
supposedly Huguenots, so then again maybe I should hate the French. And
finally there's the rumour that we have some Mi'qmaq blood. Doesn't
sound like it's based on much of anything, so maybe I'm alright rooting
against the Mi'qmaq but maybe not.
That's interesting, however my suggestion is you should know about the
Clearances and that many came here as a result etc etc. However you
drop me off when you say you 'should hate' - I feel this whole
caboodle is not whether the MM plundered and murdered and Cornwallis
then struck back, it's simply part of the history and cannot be judged
by todays standards because nothing is going to change it. In
desperate times maybe both sides did desperate things.
In my opinion there is no correct answer. No one can know the
conditions, thought processes and societal norms of 1750. It was a very
different time . . . for those who remember 1950, look at the
differences between then and now. Huge. Subtract another 200 years
from 1950 and it's impossible to know what was "right" and "wrong" then.

Regardless of who's fault one decides it was, it's silly to cheer
for either side in 2017. All we can do is hope we don't get into a
similar mess in the future.
--
HRM Resident
jvangurp
2017-09-12 11:51:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by HRM Resident
Post by l***@fl.it
Post by Mike Small
Post by jvangurp
Post by Wayne Hines
http://thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/1499773-opinion-your-ancestors-
deserve-far-more-respect-than-this
--
I used to care but things have changed.
I read that piece when it was published and it really stuck in my
craw. Not sure who "we" is in the article... it sure isn't probably
90% of Haligonians. The "we" seems to be the original German
settlers. Are they offended by the anti-Cornwallis sentiment? She
didn't ask them. She's hanging her hat on the street layout and the
buildings as being due to Corwallis? Man, that's a stretch. I find
this a really shitty piece, and I wonder why she felt a need to speak
up about it. Would like to read a critical analysis by someone who has
a better grasp of the subject.
Yeah, I'm having trouble figuring out who I should root for if I were to
turn time backwards given my foggy conception of who my ancestors
actually were. I think Small is probably Scottish, and my people quite
possibly ended up in the New World because of the Highland
Clearances. In which case, I should hate the English, right? But then
again some Smalls are English. On the other side of the family I have
Mersereaus. So maybe I should be for the French. Then again they were
supposedly Huguenots, so then again maybe I should hate the French. And
finally there's the rumour that we have some Mi'qmaq blood. Doesn't
sound like it's based on much of anything, so maybe I'm alright rooting
against the Mi'qmaq but maybe not.
That's interesting, however my suggestion is you should know about the
Clearances and that many came here as a result etc etc. However you
drop me off when you say you 'should hate' - I feel this whole
caboodle is not whether the MM plundered and murdered and Cornwallis
then struck back, it's simply part of the history and cannot be judged
by todays standards because nothing is going to change it. In
desperate times maybe both sides did desperate things.
In my opinion there is no correct answer. No one can know the
conditions, thought processes and societal norms of 1750. It was a very
different time . . . for those who remember 1950, look at the
differences between then and now. Huge. Subtract another 200 years
from 1950 and it's impossible to know what was "right" and "wrong" then.
Regardless of who's fault one decides it was, it's silly to cheer
for either side in 2017. All we can do is hope we don't get into a
similar mess in the future.
--
HRM Resident
I don't think people were any less kind or caring in the 1750s than they are today. I think the major difference is that authority figures could do pretty much whatever they wanted, and there was such deprivation with regard to food and housing and someone that they could just order people around. Law of course was different then as well and people did not live under the strict legal codes we have today. I don't think it was any easier for the ordinary citizen to murder another person then, than it is today.

Cheers,
John
HRM Resident
2017-09-12 15:20:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
snipped for brevity<
Post by HRM Resident
In my opinion there is no correct answer. No one can know the
conditions, thought processes and societal norms of 1750. It was a very
different time . . . for those who remember 1950, look at the
differences between then and now. Huge. Subtract another 200 years
from 1950 and it's impossible to know what was "right" and "wrong" then.
Regardless of who's fault one decides it was, it's silly to cheer
for either side in 2017. All we can do is hope we don't get into a
similar mess in the future.
--
HRM Resident
I don't think people were any less kind or caring in the 1750s than they are today. I think the major difference is that authority figures could do pretty much whatever they wanted, and there was such deprivation with regard to food and housing and someone that they could just order people around. Law of course was different then as well and people did not live under the strict legal codes we have today. I don't think it was any easier for the ordinary citizen to murder another person then, than it is today.
Cheers,
John
I don't know how people thought in 1750. All we have are history
books written, revised and re-written for 250 years. While it's
unlikely people were fundamentally different in their thinking in terms
of kindness and caring, everything I've ever read suggests things were a
lot tougher. Many decisions must have been made based on sheer survival.

Another thing. I believe public executions were the norm. What
that did to deter crime is up for debate, but on a slow day I bet crowds
gathered for the hanging. Ease of murder then and now? Who knows?
Today we have a lot of very efficient guns in the hands of hardened
criminals with the Internet and cell phones. There are a significant
number of murders in HRM, as well as the rest of the province. I recall
back to 1958-1960 approximately, and I am pretty sure we might have had
1-2 murders a year in the 960s. Now it's 1-2 a month or more. I'd be
interested to see what it was between 1750-1800, if any such numbers
exist and can be trusted.

Indeed governors and other figures of authority had a lot of power.
It was a brutal time in a newly settled colony in the midst of wars
between Britain and France. There were also many natives occupying Nova
Scotia at the time, so there had to be constant friction between all
three groups. I doubt if an accused had access to lawyers and appeal
courts before confederation.

People are trying to compare a country like Canada in 2017 to a
newly formed colony in 1750. How can we make such a comparison when we
really have no idea what life was like in Halifax in 1750?
--
HRM Resident
l***@fl.it
2017-09-12 16:01:48 UTC
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Raw Message
On Tue, 12 Sep 2017 12:20:14 -0300, HRM Resident
Post by HRM Resident
snipped for brevity<
Post by HRM Resident
In my opinion there is no correct answer. No one can know the
conditions, thought processes and societal norms of 1750. It was a very
different time . . . for those who remember 1950, look at the
differences between then and now. Huge. Subtract another 200 years
from 1950 and it's impossible to know what was "right" and "wrong" then.
Regardless of who's fault one decides it was, it's silly to cheer
for either side in 2017. All we can do is hope we don't get into a
similar mess in the future.
--
HRM Resident
I don't think people were any less kind or caring in the 1750s than they are today. I think the major difference is that authority figures could do pretty much whatever they wanted, and there was such deprivation with regard to food and housing and someone that they could just order people around. Law of course was different then as well and people did not live under the strict legal codes we have today. I don't think it was any easier for the ordinary citizen to murder another person then, than it is today.
Cheers,
John
I don't know how people thought in 1750. All we have are history
books written, revised and re-written for 250 years. While it's
unlikely people were fundamentally different in their thinking in terms
of kindness and caring, everything I've ever read suggests things were a
lot tougher. Many decisions must have been made based on sheer survival.
Another thing. I believe public executions were the norm. What
that did to deter crime is up for debate, but on a slow day I bet crowds
gathered for the hanging. Ease of murder then and now? Who knows?
Today we have a lot of very efficient guns in the hands of hardened
criminals with the Internet and cell phones. There are a significant
number of murders in HRM, as well as the rest of the province. I recall
back to 1958-1960 approximately, and I am pretty sure we might have had
1-2 murders a year in the 960s. Now it's 1-2 a month or more. I'd be
interested to see what it was between 1750-1800, if any such numbers
exist and can be trusted.
Indeed governors and other figures of authority had a lot of power.
It was a brutal time in a newly settled colony in the midst of wars
between Britain and France. There were also many natives occupying Nova
Scotia at the time, so there had to be constant friction between all
three groups. I doubt if an accused had access to lawyers and appeal
courts before confederation.
People are trying to compare a country like Canada in 2017 to a
newly formed colony in 1750. How can we make such a comparison when we
really have no idea what life was like in Halifax in 1750?
Correct and although it would be nice not to name anything else after
Cornwallis, just leave the rest alone, we can't alter history.
Mike Small
2017-09-13 15:48:20 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by HRM Resident
I don't know how people thought in 1750. All we have are history
books written, revised and re-written for 250 years. While it's
unlikely people were fundamentally different in their thinking in
terms of kindness and caring, everything I've ever read suggests
things were a lot tougher. Many decisions must have been made based
on sheer survival.
That's a fair point (though some wrote so history books do have some 1st
hand sources). Wanting to better learn the history where I live now I
read Mayflower by Nathaniel Philbrick. He seemed fairly objective and
described one of the first things the pilgrims doing was to dessecrate a
burial ground of the Wampanoags (I think it was) and to steal their
cornseed. But he also described how they had no real skills for
surviving in this environment and were in danger of starvation and
exposure when they finally struck land. How should I consider their
legacy? If I were descended from them I'm not sure I'd hold them up
with pride. At the same time maybe they weren't the worst humans to ever
live either. Reading further, I forget the details, but among the
pilgrims some were worse than others. I recall Miles Standish seeming
like quite a terrible person, very aggressive and prone to violence, so
that now when I walk by Boston University and see Standish Hall I wonder
if any of the students make a stink about that name.
Post by HRM Resident
People are trying to compare a country like Canada in 2017 to a
newly formed colony in 1750. How can we make such a comparison when
we really have no idea what life was like in Halifax in 1750?
Well, perhaps it needn't be a comparison then (though I think there are
universal elements to morality that the context at best can only provide
extenuating circumstances for). It could just be looking at the past and
using whatever resources we have to understand it in its context and
then deciding who we want to honour and by how much. I haven't read much
of the history and don't remember much from junior high history (sorry
Ms. O'Connell!), so I'm undecided whether it's just or reasonable to
take down the statues of Cornwallis and change street names, or if the
people who want this should compromise with those who don't. For me the
answer is that I ought to read more of the history. I had a book once
named _We Were not the Savages_ by Daniel Paul, but I never got around
to reading it and think I gave it away. Maybe that would be helpful.
--
Mike Small
***@sdf.org
l***@fl.it
2017-09-13 16:28:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike Small
Post by HRM Resident
I don't know how people thought in 1750. All we have are history
books written, revised and re-written for 250 years. While it's
unlikely people were fundamentally different in their thinking in
terms of kindness and caring, everything I've ever read suggests
things were a lot tougher. Many decisions must have been made based
on sheer survival.
That's a fair point (though some wrote so history books do have some 1st
hand sources). Wanting to better learn the history where I live now I
read Mayflower by Nathaniel Philbrick. He seemed fairly objective and
described one of the first things the pilgrims doing was to dessecrate a
burial ground of the Wampanoags (I think it was) and to steal their
cornseed. But he also described how they had no real skills for
surviving in this environment and were in danger of starvation and
exposure when they finally struck land. How should I consider their
legacy? If I were descended from them I'm not sure I'd hold them up
with pride. At the same time maybe they weren't the worst humans to ever
live either. Reading further, I forget the details, but among the
pilgrims some were worse than others. I recall Miles Standish seeming
like quite a terrible person, very aggressive and prone to violence, so
that now when I walk by Boston University and see Standish Hall I wonder
if any of the students make a stink about that name.
Post by HRM Resident
People are trying to compare a country like Canada in 2017 to a
newly formed colony in 1750. How can we make such a comparison when
we really have no idea what life was like in Halifax in 1750?
Well, perhaps it needn't be a comparison then (though I think there are
universal elements to morality that the context at best can only provide
extenuating circumstances for). It could just be looking at the past and
using whatever resources we have to understand it in its context and
then deciding who we want to honour and by how much. I haven't read much
of the history and don't remember much from junior high history (sorry
Ms. O'Connell!), so I'm undecided whether it's just or reasonable to
take down the statues of Cornwallis and change street names, or if the
people who want this should compromise with those who don't. For me the
answer is that I ought to read more of the history. I had a book once
named _We Were not the Savages_ by Daniel Paul, but I never got around
to reading it and think I gave it away. Maybe that would be helpful.
Where are you Mike? Near enough to Halifax to join the HNO (Holistic
Night Out) on the 28th at the Lions Head?
Mike Small
2017-09-14 00:10:31 UTC
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Post by l***@fl.it
Where are you Mike? Near enough to Halifax to join the HNO (Holistic
Night Out) on the 28th at the Lions Head?
Nope, I live in Boston. I grew up in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia,
mostly Dartmouth. I was up there a couple weeks ago but not going up
again until Christmas. Have fun.
--
Mike Small
***@sdf.org
Mike Spencer
2017-09-14 03:34:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike Small
Nope, I live in Boston.
Ah, so. How's Boston? I lived there for a year over 50 years ago, the
spent 3 weeks or a month in Cambridge every year from '84 to '95.
Haven't been back since '97.

But after Enlightenment Books in Harvard Sq. closed and my friends at
MIT retired or moved away, that just left Leavitt & Pierce as an
inducement. :-)
Post by Mike Small
I grew up in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, mostly Dartmouth. I was
up there a couple weeks ago but not going up again until
Christmas. Have fun.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
Mike Small
2017-09-14 17:23:25 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Mike Spencer
Ah, so. How's Boston? I lived there for a year over 50 years ago, the
spent 3 weeks or a month in Cambridge every year from '84 to '95.
Haven't been back since '97.
It's mostly good.

I feel like its transit system is straining under the weight of its
recent growth, though. When I visit Halifax, I'm maybe the only one who
rides Metro Transit (or whatever it's called now) and thinks to himself,
"wow this transit system is amazing!" But then again I don't have to
ride it during rush hour. Also, this thing with Halifax bus drivers,
that a person running towards the stop doesn't cause them to immediatly
close there doors and pound the gas, very nice thing you have there.

It's a bit inconvenient that people here are all sprawled around and
expect you to get to them anyway. Imagine if you were living in Halifax,
answered a personal ad, and the woman thought you were a turkey because
you told her she should have mentioned the fact that she lives in Truro
(or with genders reversed as the case may be).

The people are decent enough for the most part, yet not particularly
friendly. This is a case of a stereotype holding pretty well. Er, then
again "the people" in the core are often people from all over, really,
so I'm kind of off in this observation for that reason.

Job opportunities are very good. Rent is only somewhat less insane than
San Francisco or NYC (and, sorry, Boston is not as compelling a city as
NYC nor even San Francisco) and will probably get worse if more
companies locate here. Don't know if it's in the news for you about
Toronto "bidding" to bring Amazon's 2nd HQ there, but Boston is also one
of the front runners. If that happens, rent and transit problems will
explode I expect. They should pick Toronto I think, for one thing since
it's a larger city probably with a bigger talent pool and better
infrastructure ready for them, but also just for the message it will
send Americans about the costs of fearing immigrants.

I'm not at all unhappy here, but I think I might look for a more Halifax
sized city when I retire, or at least some place different, depending on
whether personal committments allow for it.
Post by Mike Spencer
But after Enlightenment Books in Harvard Sq. closed and my friends at
MIT retired or moved away, that just left Leavitt & Pierce as an
inducement. :-)
Well, that's still here. I don't smoke, so I only went in there one
time looking for a Christmas present. Neat looking place.

There's also really good free software related activities here. For
instance, a guy from work and I are going to the FSF's headquarters
tonight for an open house, and the yearly Libreplanet conference is
here, these days in a new MIT building designed by Frank Gehry. Also a
regular at the local perl mongers group who is close friends with Larry
Wall, and they all seem to know Randall Schwartz pretty well. Sadly the
Perl Mongers haven't been getting the crowds they used to though. Now,
the Python talks here have long waiting lists, which maybe I should take
a hint from.
--
Mike Small
***@sdf.org
Mike Spencer
2017-09-16 06:21:26 UTC
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Post by Mike Small
Post by Mike Spencer
Ah, so. How's Boston? I lived there for a year over 50 years ago, the
spent 3 weeks or a month in Cambridge every year from '84 to '95.
Haven't been back since '97.
It's mostly good.
Thanks for the update. I've never used a bus in Boston, just the
T. The worst gripe I had there was that in the 90s, I was staying in
Jamaica Plain. They had truncated the Green Line when the opened the
Orange Line, then realized it was a mistake but couldn't restore it
because it wouldn't/couldn't have disabled access. Existing Green Line
setup is grandfathered.
Post by Mike Small
Job opportunities are very good. Rent is only somewhat less insane than
San Francisco or NYC (and, sorry, Boston is not as compelling a city as
NYC nor even San Francisco) and will probably get worse if more
companies locate here.
When I lived there, we had a very reasonably priced apt on Beacon
Hill. Came fully equipped with cockroaches, though. With twin
infants, that was one of the chief motivations to leave the city.
That same apartment had acquired bars on the windows when I went to
look circa 1990.
Post by Mike Small
Don't know if it's in the news for you about Toronto "bidding" to
bring Amazon's 2nd HQ there, but Boston is also one of the front
runners.
Hadn't heard that. And I read the G&M every Saturday. :-)
Post by Mike Small
Post by Mike Spencer
But after Enlightenment Books in Harvard Sq. closed and my friends at
MIT retired or moved away, that just left Leavitt & Pierce as an
inducement. :-)
Well, that's still here. I don't smoke, so I only went in there one
time looking for a Christmas present. Neat looking place.
It was even neater before they had to sell their astonishing
collection of antique pipes. As recently as 40 years ago, every new
Harvard Man had to have a pipe or two. With the steep decline in
smoking, they're strugging. Ehrlich's, their companion store in
Boston, closed.
Post by Mike Small
There's also really good free software related activities here. For
instance, a guy from work and I are going to the FSF's headquarters
tonight for an open house, and the yearly Libreplanet conference is
here, these days in a new MIT building designed by Frank Gehry.
Is that the one with the rail line trough the middle of it?
Post by Mike Small
Also a regular at the local perl mongers group who is close friends
with Larry Wall, and they all seem to know Randall Schwartz pretty
well. Sadly the Perl Mongers haven't been getting the crowds they
used to though. Now, the Python talks here have long waiting lists,
which maybe I should take a hint from.
Yeah, I really liked access to all that tech stuff during the
scattered months I spent hanging out at MIT. I even got paid to do
it, came back each trip with a backpack full of books.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
l***@fl.it
2017-09-14 11:25:03 UTC
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Post by Mike Small
Post by l***@fl.it
Where are you Mike? Near enough to Halifax to join the HNO (Holistic
Night Out) on the 28th at the Lions Head?
Nope, I live in Boston. I grew up in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia,
mostly Dartmouth. I was up there a couple weeks ago but not going up
again until Christmas. Have fun.
You could get together with axemen, he's just outside Boston :) If
this one works as well as they used to, we'll raise the idea of having
one at Xmas when you are up here :)
Mike Small
2017-09-14 17:32:35 UTC
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Post by l***@fl.it
You could get together with axemen, he's just outside Boston :) If
this one works as well as they used to, we'll raise the idea of having
one at Xmas when you are up here :)
I wonder if I've met him. There is a Canadian Meetup group here. I've
gone to a couple of their outings, but not ones that were very heavily
attended. There's also an older Canada / America friendship social club
in Watertown (a nearby suburb) with a real building. Lots of Cape
Bretoners there. I went with someone one time who herself was from Cape
Breton. They all got to talking about home and after noticing my blank
looks at place names, one of them quipped, "you know we have a causeway
now." Funny, I just didn't get over there much growing up. Then there's
a similar place out in Waltham, where I once saw Ashley MacIsaac play,
not as a concert so much, just as part of the band for a dance / get
together.

Sure, I'd come out if the dates work out for people. I usually visit
leaving a couple days either side of Christmas.
--
Mike Small
***@sdf.org
HRM Resident
2017-09-13 17:48:05 UTC
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snipped for brevity<
I'm undecided whether it's just or reasonable to
take down the statues of Cornwallis and change street names, or if the
people who want this should compromise with those who don't.
I disagree. No one alive today can tell if what happened in 1750
was just or reasonable. No one alive today can make an evidence based
decision on whether or not Cornwallis was justified in doing what he
did. Any conclusion would have to be drawn from ideological beliefs
because there is no reliable evidence. Apparently those who put the
statue, park and street names in place thought they did have some
evidence (or they did it for political reasons.) I don't know when any
of these items were erected or named, but it was done by people closer
in time to 1750 than anyone alive today. I guess I'll have to defer to
their judgement until someone shows me reliable evidence that one side
or the other was wrong. Given that the "erectors" were closer in time,
maybe they had better "evidence."

Regarding apologizing to, or feeling guilty for what was reportedly
done to, any of the parties involved I can honestly say none of my
ancestors had anything to do with it. They showed up in what's now a
province in the country of Canada approximately 100 years after 1750 and
about 15-20 years before Confederation. They didn't participate in any
decisions about naming things, and they had no part in doing any of it.
For those who can trace their ancestry back to 1750 in Halifax, can any
of them tell me what they saw? I think not. Did their grandparents
tell them what they saw? Nope. Maybe a
great-great-great-great-great-great-great grandparent could have told
them what they thought happened . . . we're getting pretty deep into the
7-8 generation hearsay world now.

I wonder how long it will be before this issue fades away.
--
HRM Resident
Mike Small
2017-09-11 15:06:54 UTC
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Post by Wayne Hines
http://thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/1499773-opinion-your-ancestors-
deserve-far-more-respect-than-this
She starts well enough, but really lost me in the last two paragraphs,
seeming downright dismissive of any view that either tries to see things
from the Mi'qmaq perspective or from a universal moral position. And the
bit portraying Halifax as if it was devoid of human population before
the British arrived is obviously flawed.

The facts about Broussard fleshed out something my dad said when I
raised this issue about Cornwallis's statue while visiting. He said
there was an historical context that had to be considered when judging
Cornwallis's scalping bounty. This must have been what he was driving
at.

But I reject arguments suggesting today's standards for morality can't
be applied to the past.

First of all, I'm not so sure today's standards have advanced from
standards in the past, necessarily. Is there such a thing as moral
progress, or has Canada simply become, because of the order put in place
by the victors, stable and peaceful enough that the worst of human
behaviour doesn't rear its ugly head as much. Second, taking the two
historical facts about scalping together still allows for a
"post-modern, marxist, politically correct" interpretation where one
can't help but notice the one leading the opposing raid involving
scalping was also a European. No doubt it would be stupid and ignorant
to suppose Nova Scotia's original inhabitants were all angels who never
attacked and raided their enemy's settlements, but I don't actually know
much about the history. So if there are articles going into more depth
on that history, keep them coming.
--
Mike Small
***@sdf.org
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